top of page

Better blood thinning medication


Red blood cells

Research from Switzerland and Australia, using tsetse flies, has uncovered a new way to prevent blood clotting that can also be easily switched on and off.


Blood-thinning medications, known as anticoagulants, prevent blood clotting and are crucial for managing heart diseases and strokes. However, they can lead to an increased risk of bleeding, particularly after surgeries when clotting is still needed.


A study from the University of Geneva and the University of Sydney, has developed an anticoagulant by binding together two small proteins (peptides): a synthetic one and one from tsetse flies, which use this peptide to collect blood for feeding.


This new drug can then be ‘deactivated’ on demand by using another peptide (antidote) that breaks the bond in the anticoagulant - particularly useful after surgical procedures.

This new approach was then successfully tested in human and mouse blood samples and live mice.


Nicolas Winssinger, at Geneva, and one of the lead researchers in this study, said: “(The) approach proposed is remarkably flexible and can be easily adapted to other therapeutic targets. It is particularly promising in the field of immunotherapy.”


The full article is published in Nature Biotechnology.

4 comentarios


shooter bubble
shooter bubble
31 may

We are always the creators of games and always give you the best today. That is Bubble shooter

Me gusta

Priyanka Sharma
Priyanka Sharma
23 may

Our Goa Escorts call girls offers a scope of tempting and ravishing call girls. You can bounce into the expanse of erotic nature with beguiling and lasciviousness sexy call girls.

Me gusta

su xeko
su xeko
22 may

I believe your brilliant and original idea will be duplicated and used to stimulate the production of many other ideas. retro games

Me gusta

Hinton Lawrence
Hinton Lawrence
21 may

This is such exciting news! Finding a way to prevent blood clotting without the risk of increased bleeding could be a game-changer for so many tunnel rush patients, especially those undergoing surgeries.

Me gusta
bottom of page